In Bach’s pre-Enlightenment time, understanding how and why he composed his music might lead contemporary composers to new and exciting areas. Learn more.

Christine Elise Occhino is a serial entrepreneur with a passion for the music business. In addition to being a vocalist herself, she is the CEO of Elise Music Group, Artistic Director of The Pop Music Academy, and owner of Stamford Recording Studio. She is also the proud Founder and Executive Director of Hope in Harmony, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that uses music to help and heal those in need. Christine is a member of the Grammy Recording Academy, the American Society of Composers, Authors, & Publishers, and the Berklee College of Music Alumni Association. She has spoken on many music industry panels, contributed writing for music business publications for over a decade, and currently hosts the music-based web series and podcast, Soundbytez.

While you certainly want to stay true to your own artistic style and write songs that are not a carbon copy of the next big thing in your genre, you also don’t want to misread your audience. For example, fans of John Mayer may have latched onto your recent acoustic singer/songwriter-esque release, but they may jump ship when they hear the synth heavy alt-rock that you’ve been crafting.

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Vocals are the heart of almost every pop song. In fact, save for instrumental music, vocals should be the focal point of a song in any genre. Whenever listeners find themselves humming along to a song, it’s usually the top-line vocal melody they’re latching onto, so mixing that aspect of your song’s arrangement for ultimate clarity is of particular importance.

“Get your Boss on with this original collection of line drawings depicting the many faces of Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter Bruce Springsteen, the artist behind best-selling albums like Born to Run, The River, Born in the USA, and Chapter and Verse. A unique and fun gift for fans of all ages.”

Exclusively on our Instagram account, we’ll be sharing videos and stories instructing some fun and modern aspects of home production. (By the way, we issue fun production and composition challenges every month, and follow them down the rabbit hole ourselves with you. Follow us to see what happens and join in!)

Whether you’re drafting demos for your next album, producing a 30-second spot for a video or beats for an electronic project, or actually tracking an entire album with your band in your living room, combining the comfort of your domestic space with business-like workflow habits and studio quality gear can lead to great results — so long as you don’t fall through one of the many trap doors inherent to this way of working.

“The chacona was a sexily swirling dance that appeared in South America at the end of the sixteenth century and quickly spread to Europe, becoming popular both in the elite courts and in the general population.”

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Vocals are the heart of almost every pop song. In fact, save for instrumental music, vocals should be the focal point of a song in any genre. Whenever listeners find themselves humming along to a song, it’s usually the top-line vocal melody they’re latching onto, so mixing that aspect of your song’s arrangement for ultimate clarity is of particular importance.

“Don’t Cry”: Holy loop choppidies! Watch out in the middle of the verses at 0:46 and 1:37, where they slice out just a sliver of the track — you hardly notice it. Then, marvel as they start the bridge (at 1:53) with a bolder half-beat chop-out. And then at 2:10, just in case you were getting used to these chops, they trip you up by adding half a beat instead!

With his final piece, I think Stefano achieved a really amazing vibrancy and power. The way it climbs the register increases the tension and emotional pull. The monophonic transitions create urgency and more power. And the different treatments of the different sections create a lot of interest and variation. Overall, he created a beautiful piece!” — Ian (Soundfly Mentor)

When you establish a color scheme strongly, it becomes even easier to then subvert it and supplant a freshness into your look. White’s video for his solo song “Freedom at 21” exemplifies this perfectly. Here, he puts a ton of emphasis on the neon green of his sports car and the bright pink of the policewoman’s lipstick; the colors feel as though they’re going to jump off the screen at any moment.